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ASTOR PLACE as seen in five time periods

(photo 1) Astor Place Theater 1851

(photo 2) Renamed as Clinton Hall in 1875

(photo 3) Clinton Hall in 1891

(photo 4) Previously building torn down. Replaced by this building, still called Clinton Hall, in 1892.

(photo 5) Still there now.

Drawing of Art Street (before it was known as Astor Place) and Broadway in 1829.

Drawing of Art Street (before it was known as Astor Place) and Broadway in 1829.

Yet another snowy day in Manhattan. Central Park circa 1900. Love her hat!

Yet another snowy day in Manhattan. Central Park circa 1900. Love her hat!

The top one is from 1903. The bottom one is from 1911. Interesting to note that Manhattan didn’t have its first electric traffic signal until 1919. This was on 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue, and it was operated by a police officer. In 1924 the city installed automatically controlled lights at 50 intersections. They only had red and green lights — no yellow. In 1953, after it was found that New York led the nation in traffic accidents, they changed to using three-color lights. 

PS. Gotta love the hat!

34th Street and Broadway in 1911

34th Street and Broadway in 1911

El Train at 65th Street and Columbus Avenue northwest of Lincoln Center.

El Train at 65th Street and Columbus Avenue northwest of Lincoln Center.

Broadway at Herald Square 1911

Broadway at Herald Square 1911

Thirty sixth street and Second Avenue

Thirty sixth street and Second Avenue

Forty Second Street looking west of Fifth Avenue in 1918

Forty Second Street looking west of Fifth Avenue in 1918

Three photographs by Alice Austen. Getting rid of the snow after a blizzard in 1896. The one with the pick-ax actually looks kind of frozen.

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